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Old Oct 3rd 2014, 02:26 PM
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Default Munster Walkthrough Expanded



Crusader Kings II - Petty King Murchad of Munster Walkthrough - Expanded

Being a new player to the game, I found the Munster Walkthrough on the net and I tried to follow it. Unfortunately, I still had a hard time with it because I was a total newbie to the game and I had no clue why and how I was supposed to be doing the things the walkthrough told me to do so I kept making big mistakes and getting into a mess of trouble.

So here is my attempt to expand the Munster Walkthrough for newbies.

First of all, don't unpause the simulator until you've completed your initial arrangements because the list of available brides/grooms is going to get much smaller really quick once the game is running.

1. Get married

Your overall "state stats" come from your ruler + half of your wife's stats, so as a general rule, your ruler always needs to be married or your state stats are going to be lower than they could be.

Please keep in mind that marriages of your ruler and his/her children are one of the only ways in the game to create military/political alliances. Marriages that will produce an alliance are marked with a blue flag in the available marriage listing.

If you look through the listing, I think the 'best' available choices include several daughters of the Welsh King of Gwynedd as well as a Danish and a Norwegian princess and a couple of minor-age daughters of the King of England. If you want to get a bit more adventurous, there is usually a Byzantine or Spanish princess available.

If you want a large family, look for a "Midas Touched" or "Fortune Builder" education, and/or the Lustful trait in your prospective spouse, as these provide a boost to fertility.

Note1: In the 1066 game start marriage listing, there are no available females with titles and there are none with the Genius, Strong or Quick traits.

Note2: For a quick piety bonus, make sure you choose the "get married" ambition for your character immediately. You should get married pretty quick so you can then choose another ambition.

Note3: When you do get married (or your principal heir gets married), you will get a pop-up saying the people will give you a gift of money. I recommend to refuse the money and take the prestige instead (usually 200 points) - that's way more valuable than the relatively small amount of money at this starting point in the game.

2. Councillors

The walkthroughs don't mention this but your councillors are super important.

Your Chancellor is needed to create those all-important forged claims, but is also useful for helping other people like you more. I recommend putting him in your vassal county of Ormond at the start of the game. With the Earl of Ormond happy, he will supply you with more tax and troops and you will need them. Once you get a good opinion boost on the Earl of Ormond, move the Chancellor to one of the four counties of Ulster to try to forge a claim. It really doesn't matter which county you choose. It will likely take a few years for this process to work. If/when it does succeed, pay the price and move your Councillor to another county and repeat the process. You need to acquire/forge claims on three of the four counties of Ulster, so it is likely to take quite a while for that to happen.

Your Spymaster should be sent to steal technology. Constantinople, Verona, Lombardy and Firenze are all good places as they are technologically way ahead of Ireland at the beginning of the game. Put your spymaster there and leave him there unless you have some special task for the Spymaster to do. It is basically a game-style choice whether you prefer to devote your spymaster's time and energy to advancing technology or for more nefarious pursuits. If you are planning for a longer dynastic game spanning centuries, then building technology is crucial. If you are looking at playing just the lifetime of one starting character, then you can ignore technology and use your spymaster entirely for intrigue. For most players, a combination of the two is probably best.

Your Steward has one special task that is extremely useful at the beginning of the game. Set your Steward to collect taxes in Thomond. At the beginning of the game, you have little money and low income - the extra tax money is a great boost. Later on, it may be better to use the Steward for other tasks, but at the beginning of the game, getting more gold is super important.

If you have no specific tasks for a councillor, they should be in your capital county doing research at the beginning of the game. Don't let any councillor ever sit around idle as that is a waste of a good resource.

3. De Jure Claim on Desmond

Basically, this means that you can declare war on Desmond whenever you like (because you are the 'de Jure' holder of the Duchy of Munster). If/when you win that war, the Earl of Desmond will become your vassal. However, at the beginning of the game, you are likely too weak to win that war, so you need to build up your power. This means getting your bishop, your mayor and your vassal Earl of Ormond to love you, so they will give you a larger levy that you need to beat Desmond.

Once you think you can beat Desmond, go for it, but it isn't easy at the very beginning of the game to do this. You can usually beat Desmond's army, but then likely not have enough troops to seige Desmond. It is best to wait a few years and build up your strength a bit first.

I've found that hiring mercenaries can be expensive but a very useful strategy. The Irish Band costs 190 gold to hire, then approx 10 gold per month. That means that to hire and pay these mercenaries for a year costs 310 gold. With the Steward on extra tax collection duty, you should be able to collect this amount of money within a few years or so. I like to hire the mercanary army, combine it with my army and use that to absolutely crush the enemy army swiftly. Then I disband the mercenaries because they are too expensive to keep around. You should be able to do that in under a year. Then use your own levy troops to do the slow seige process to win the war.

Once you win that war, the Earl of Desmond will become your vassal just like the Earl of Ormond. This gives you three of the seven counties you need to control in order to become King of Ireland.

4. Plot to Revoke the County of Ormond

This game is not about being nice. Yes, you just flattered the Earl of Ormond to help you defeat the Earl of Desmond and now you are going to turn around and plot against him because you want his county. You do this by going to the intrigue window and selecting this plot. You may have to go to war with Ormond, but after the conquest of Desmond, this should be easy since Ormond isn't very strong and now you are way stronger than he is.

5. Acquire 3 Counties of Ulster

You need to control seven counties and two duchies of Ireland in order to create the Kingdom of Ireland. Any seven counties will work. The duchy of Ulster consists of the four most northern counties in Ireland - see diagram above.

You already have the Duchy of Munster and three counties, so you need to add one duchy and four counties. Ulster is a duchy with four counties which is why all the walkthroughs recommend Ulster as your target. The process is simple. Set your Councillor to forge a claim in any of the four counties of Ulster. Once you have a claim, move the Councillor to the next county while you declare war using the claim you just got. Repeat until you have three counties of Ulster.

6. Create Duchy of Ulster

Once you have three counties within the de jure territory of Ulster, you can create the Duchy. As soon as you create the Duchy, you will automatically have a 'de jure' claim on the fourth county of Ulster that you don't already have, so take that fourth county (make them a vassal).

You can do this process with other counties and other duchies in Ireland if you like. Ulster is recommended as the easiest way to get there, but other choices can work just as well. Personally, I like to take Dublin so I can move my capital there as soon as I create the Kingdom of Ireland.

Note: Do not create any extra duchy titles unless you plan to give them away immediately. You can only hold two duchy titles. Holding a third (or more) duchy title will cause a huge penalty (-25) with your vassals. Destroying duchy titles will cause an even larger penalty (-50) with all 'de jure' vassals of that duchy, so don't create a duchy title unless you are doing it for a good reason.

7. Create Kingdom of Ireland

If you control seven counties and two duchies inside Ireland, you can create the Kingdom of Ireland. Doing so is expensive (costs 400 piety I think), but it will give you an automatic 'de jure' claim on all remaining territories of Ireland. In some cases, these other counties may agree to become your vassals without conquest - a gift of gold often helps. For those that will not accept voluntary vassalization, you may have to force them or replace them.

That's it. Now that you are the King of Ireland, you are a player on the world's stage. Brittany, Wales, Scotland and Norway are all good expansion areas - or there is the goal to create the Empire of Britannia. The game is open ended.

Note: It is certainly possible to achieve the Kingdom of Ireland within the lifetime of Murchad of Munster, though this quick pace can be challenging for newbies and you need to get lucky with a really good Chancellor (16+) to do it.

Comments and/or questions are always welcome.
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Old Oct 3rd 2014, 03:15 PM
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Default Re: Munster Walkthrough Expanded

Looks solid to me.

Incidentally, I did manage to take over the Duchy of Munster starting as the Count of Desmond rather than as Duke Murchad. In some ways, it's actually easier.

The trick is to simply revoke the positions of both your vassals (your bishop and the mayor of Cork) as soon as your chancellor gets a claim on Ormond or Thomond. Since you'll then directly hold both those titles, you'll get the full levies from them in addition to the levy from your castle. This actually gives you substantially MORE troops than Murchad can field, despite the fact that he's a duke. Murchard only gets a partial levy form the minor holdings in Thomond (and maybe none from the Bishop there) and he gets hardly anything from Ormond because the count there hates his guts at the beginning of the game. If your marshall has been successful in raising your max levies, it's possible to outnumber Murchad's troops by nearly 2-to-1 when you launch your invasion.

Normally this strategy would be counter-productive because revoking a vassals position gives you a massive negative modifier with all your other vassals. But since you only have two vassals to start with and you're revoking both, there aren't any left to hate you for it and your future vassals don't seem to hold a grudge over the revoking you did before you became their lord. The other drawback is that you lose 75% of the tax revenue for "improper" holdings (towns and churches). But chances are you weren't getting any money from the church anyway (unless the bishop really, really liked you) and the increased levies are more than worth the temporary decrease in revenue. You'll be handing out those titles again once you finish taking over a few provinces anyway.

Once you have Ormond or Thomond you can usurp Murchad's title and thus gain a claim the remaining province, those it's even better if your chancellor can get both claims before the war starts so you can take the whole thing in one go.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents based on very, very limited playtime. Tragically, my new Duke of Munster died a mysterious death when the laptop he was saved on suffered a complete hardware disaster. Reviving him to continue his quest for glory will be a challenging endeavor. I might just restart when I find the time.
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Old Oct 3rd 2014, 03:26 PM
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Michael Michael is offline
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Default Re: Munster Walkthrough Expanded

Quote:
Originally Posted by dilettante View Post
Looks solid to me.

Incidentally, I did manage to take over the Duchy of Munster starting as the Count of Desmond rather than as Duke Murchad. In some ways, it's actually easier.

The trick is to simply revoke the positions of both your vassals (your bishop and the mayor of Cork) as soon as your chancellor gets a claim on Ormond or Thomond. Since you'll then directly hold both those titles, you'll get the full levies from them in addition to the levy from your castle. This actually gives you substantially MORE troops than Murchad can field, despite the fact that he's a duke. Murchard only gets a partial levy form the minor holdings in Thomond (and maybe none from the Bishop there) and he gets hardly anything from Ormond because the count there hates his guts at the beginning of the game. If your marshall has been successful in raising your max levies, it's possible to outnumber Murchad's troops by nearly 2-to-1 when you launch your invasion.

Normally this strategy would be counter-productive because revoking a vassals position gives you a massive negative modifier with all your other vassals. But since you only have two vassals to start with and you're revoking both, there aren't any left to hate you for it and your future vassals don't seem to hold a grudge over the revoking you did before you became their lord. The other drawback is that you lose 75% of the tax revenue for "improper" holdings (towns and churches). But chances are you weren't getting any money from the church anyway (unless the bishop really, really liked you) and the increased levies are more than worth the temporary decrease in revenue. You'll be handing out those titles again once you finish taking over a few provinces anyway.

Once you have Ormond or Thomond you can usurp Murchad's title and thus gain a claim the remaining province, those it's even better if your chancellor can get both claims before the war starts so you can take the whole thing in one go.

Anyway, that's my 2 cents based on very, very limited playtime. Tragically, my new Duke of Munster died a mysterious death when the laptop he was saved on suffered a complete hardware disaster. Reviving him to continue his quest for glory will be a challenging endeavor. I might just restart when I find the time.
Very interesting variation on the Munster start. Once you have the Munster Duchy, the rest of the walk through would be basically the same. The time frame to do it pretty much depends on the quality/luck of one's Chancellor. Pity about your poor laptop.

I ended up not taking the last county of Ulster when I had 3 of 4 because Ulster had some heavy-duty alliances that would make that war way too serious, so I scooped up Dublin instead. When I created the Kingdom, Ulster agreed to vassalization (after a gift of course).

Overall, I found going from Murchad to King of Ireland is relatively easy - which is appropriate for a beginner/tutorial/1st game for newbies.
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