Discussion World Forum  


Go Back   Discussion World Forum > Discussion Forums > Science

Science From your kid's science project to relativity, this is the place to discuss it.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old Jan 22nd 2013, 07:26 PM
Michael's Avatar
Michael Michael is offline
Administrator
Herder of Cats
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 14,835
Default Future Science & Technology

This thread is all about wild and unhinged speculations.

Lets just assume that sometime in the next couple of decades we invent fusion energy. That would help us get us past the big 21st century problem of oil depletion and global climate change.

So, assuming that we don't destroy this planet and modern society completely in the next half-dozen decades (as looks increasingly likely), and assuming that we do invent fusion in the near term, my question is, how long do you think it would take for humans to develop space travel technology?

Star Trek for example is set in the 25th century and they have warp-drive engines, transporters and replicators. Do you think this would be a realistic projection for the future?
__________________
Remember what the dormouse said: Feed your head!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old Jan 22nd 2013, 08:37 PM
NickKIELCEPoland's Avatar
NickKIELCEPoland NickKIELCEPoland is offline
Globetrotter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 8,082
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
This thread is all about wild and unhinged speculations.

Lets just assume that sometime in the next couple of decades we invent fusion energy. That would help us get us past the big 21st century problem of oil depletion and global climate change.

So, assuming that we don't destroy this planet and modern society completely in the next half-dozen decades (as looks increasingly likely), and assuming that we do invent fusion in the near term, my question is, how long do you think it would take for humans to develop space travel technology?

Star Trek for example is set in the 25th century and they have warp-drive engines, transporters and replicators. Do you think this would be a realistic projection for the future?
No, I think you're getting into the realms of fantasy, there.
__________________
Europe
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old Jan 23rd 2013, 12:38 AM
Greendruid's Avatar
Greendruid Greendruid is offline
Resident Anthropologist
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Rural Nova Scotia
Posts: 1,628
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickKIELCEPoland View Post
No, I think you're getting into the realms of fantasy, there.
Indeed, that's what Jules Verne's contemporaries thought too. Not to mention Copernicus', Bruno's, de Gama's, and a whole bunch of individuals who thought about crazy ideas ... and then tried them out. I would wager that it is the only way we get anywhere. The individual doesn't really matter in some cases but one of the penguins has to be the first to jump into the ocean. Trying things out and exploring is central to being human, along with writing good fantasy. If someone told me when I was a child that I could have a device in my pocket in 2013 that was capable of accessing the vast majority of recorded human history, I would have laughed. Heck, I would have laughed 20 years ago. I once remember about 20 years ago that Michael predicted to me that the advent of what we now know as high speed modems would mean that TV would start to become eroded by people having their own channels. YouTube is, today, probably the site I access the most for entertainment. I haven't watched a television programme on a TV in years.

All this being said, I was reading/watching the announcement of a new company in the US called Deep Space Industries that is proposing to have a fleet of small asteroid probe space-craft for the purposes of surveying and mining asteroids. Their launch aim is 2015!!! This is the sort of thing I think our species will engage in repeatedly as we try to replace fossil fuels with something ... anything. If we pull through somehow, we're going to have to get a whole lot better at combatting infectious diseases so this is the area that I see needing expansion if Michael's scenario is to play out.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old Jan 23rd 2013, 02:01 AM
MeMyselfAndI MeMyselfAndI is offline
Globetrotter
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Moscow, Russia
Posts: 6,453
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

I agree with Greendruid. It is good to try to imagine what the future would be like.

Unfortunately, most modern fantastical writers and filmmakers in Russia are apocalypticals.

Listen to them, our future is something like this



Older ones, like the brothers Strugatsky, were very good though.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old Jan 23rd 2013, 02:20 AM
NickKIELCEPoland's Avatar
NickKIELCEPoland NickKIELCEPoland is offline
Globetrotter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 8,082
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greendruid View Post
Indeed, that's what Jules Verne's contemporaries thought too. Not to mention Copernicus', Bruno's, de Gama's, and a whole bunch of individuals who thought about crazy ideas ... and then tried them out. I would wager that it is the only way we get anywhere. The individual doesn't really matter in some cases but one of the penguins has to be the first to jump into the ocean. Trying things out and exploring is central to being human, along with writing good fantasy. If someone told me when I was a child that I could have a device in my pocket in 2013 that was capable of accessing the vast majority of recorded human history, I would have laughed. Heck, I would have laughed 20 years ago. I once remember about 20 years ago that Michael predicted to me that the advent of what we now know as high speed modems would mean that TV would start to become eroded by people having their own channels. YouTube is, today, probably the site I access the most for entertainment. I haven't watched a television programme on a TV in years.

All this being said, I was reading/watching the announcement of a new company in the US called Deep Space Industries that is proposing to have a fleet of small asteroid probe space-craft for the purposes of surveying and mining asteroids. Their launch aim is 2015!!! This is the sort of thing I think our species will engage in repeatedly as we try to replace fossil fuels with something ... anything. If we pull through somehow, we're going to have to get a whole lot better at combatting infectious diseases so this is the area that I see needing expansion if Michael's scenario is to play out.
All that proves is that you were unaware of certain developments 20 years ago. I think it was roughly 20 years ago that I was introduced to a CD-rom which contained an entire encyclopaedia, so I certainly wouldn't have laughed if someone had told me that 20 years ago. (although if they'd told me about some of the other things the Internet would be able to do, I'd have been truly astonished)

I personally think Michael is indeed wandering in the realms of fantasy about his prediction of a star-trekesque 25th century, but who knows, I could be wrong.
__________________
Europe

Last edited by NickKIELCEPoland; Jan 23rd 2013 at 02:34 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old Jan 23rd 2013, 06:49 PM
Michael's Avatar
Michael Michael is offline
Administrator
Herder of Cats
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 14,835
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greendruid View Post
Indeed, that's what Jules Verne's contemporaries thought too. Not to mention Copernicus', Bruno's, de Gama's, and a whole bunch of individuals who thought about crazy ideas ... and then tried them out. I would wager that it is the only way we get anywhere. The individual doesn't really matter in some cases but one of the penguins has to be the first to jump into the ocean. Trying things out and exploring is central to being human, along with writing good fantasy. If someone told me when I was a child that I could have a device in my pocket in 2013 that was capable of accessing the vast majority of recorded human history, I would have laughed. Heck, I would have laughed 20 years ago. I once remember about 20 years ago that Michael predicted to me that the advent of what we now know as high speed modems would mean that TV would start to become eroded by people having their own channels. YouTube is, today, probably the site I access the most for entertainment. I haven't watched a television programme on a TV in years.

All this being said, I was reading/watching the announcement of a new company in the US called Deep Space Industries that is proposing to have a fleet of small asteroid probe space-craft for the purposes of surveying and mining asteroids. Their launch aim is 2015!!! This is the sort of thing I think our species will engage in repeatedly as we try to replace fossil fuels with something ... anything. If we pull through somehow, we're going to have to get a whole lot better at combatting infectious diseases so this is the area that I see needing expansion if Michael's scenario is to play out.
Yes, it does seem as if our biology/disease research side has stagnated after a really impressive set of gains in the first half of the 20th century. For us to keep moving forward, biological science is going to need to improve their game and stop chasing profits by creating fake diseases.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeMyselfAndI View Post
I agree with Greendruid. It is good to try to imagine what the future would be like.

Unfortunately, most modern fantastical writers and filmmakers in Russia are apocalypticals.
This is certainly reasonable and rational. Any intelligent observer looking at earth future 50 years now is faced with the high probability that your pictures will be exactly what it will look like, given our present course.

That's why I predicated this thread discussion on the baseline assumption that fusion power will be discovered sometime in the next few decades. Without that, I fear your photos will become all too realistic. Fusion energy is the minimum baseline of technology for human society to keep growing upwards and outwords. Without it, I fear we are doomed to watching our fossil fuel sources dwindle away while the planet's climate becomes increasingly problematic.

Just remember, that as the oil crisis hits us harder and harder, that will act as a major drag on development and the economy, inducing long term recessions and depressions and that will hinder any attempt to build new energy infrastructures needed.
__________________
Remember what the dormouse said: Feed your head!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old Jan 24th 2013, 10:04 AM
Americano's Avatar
Americano Americano is offline
Globetrotter
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,614
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
Yes, it does seem as if our biology/disease research side has stagnated after a really impressive set of gains in the first half of the 20th century. For us to keep moving forward, biological science is going to need to improve their game and stop chasing profits by creating fake diseases.
I see obesity and its multitude of side affects becoming the major US biological problem.

Quote:
This is certainly reasonable and rational. Any intelligent observer looking at earth future 50 years now is faced with the high probability that your pictures will be exactly what it will look like, given our present course.

That's why I predicated this thread discussion on the baseline assumption that fusion power will be discovered sometime in the next few decades. Without that, I fear your photos will become all too realistic. Fusion energy is the minimum baseline of technology for human society to keep growing upwards and outwords. Without it, I fear we are doomed to watching our fossil fuel sources dwindle away while the planet's climate becomes increasingly problematic.

Just remember, that as the oil crisis hits us harder and harder, that will act as a major drag on development and the economy, inducing long term recessions and depressions and that will hinder any attempt to build new energy infrastructures needed.
Visited a major US inner-city lately? Abandoned and burned out buildings and vehicles are the prevailing decor.
__________________
"No one ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people."
~H.L. Mencken~
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old Jan 24th 2013, 07:07 PM
Michael's Avatar
Michael Michael is offline
Administrator
Herder of Cats
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Toronto
Posts: 14,835
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Americano View Post
I see obesity and its multitude of side affects becoming the major US biological problem.
At present, the biggest biological problem comes from the US cultural trend for giving out antibiotics to everyone for everything that has been going on for several decades now. This policy is directly linked with the evolution of new antibiotic-resistant diseases out there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Americano View Post
Visited a major US inner-city lately? Abandoned and burned out buildings and vehicles are the prevailing decor.
But that's a product of US tax policies and US racism, nothing more, nothing less. It is not a normal result. Burned out buildings in the middle of cities is a phenomena unique to the USA in the western world.

For most western countries not named USA, the center of large cities boast the highest property values in the country.
__________________
Remember what the dormouse said: Feed your head!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old Jan 24th 2013, 11:00 PM
Americano's Avatar
Americano Americano is offline
Globetrotter
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 8,614
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
At present, the biggest biological problem comes from the US cultural trend for giving out antibiotics to everyone for everything that has been going on for several decades now. This policy is directly linked with the evolution of new antibiotic-resistant diseases out there.
No argument with that. My point is what's down the road combined with existing problems.

Quote:
But that's a product of US tax policies and US racism, nothing more, nothing less. It is not a normal result. Burned out buildings in the middle of cities is a phenomena unique to the USA in the western world.

For most western countries not named USA, the center of large cities boast the highest property values in the country.
We haven't had a thread on US racism in quite some time. I posted one with the opinion it hadn't changed other than being covered by a veneer of political correctness and fear of civil lawsuits. That opinion was bombarded by claims of vast improvement due to expanded education creating cultural change desiring minority acceptance.

US tax policy has always been generated by what's desirable to capital. Relocating city center unskilled populations to who knows where or making them productive citizens has yet to become a viable option.
__________________
"No one ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American people."
~H.L. Mencken~
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old Jan 24th 2013, 11:14 PM
Dominick's Avatar
Dominick Dominick is offline
Globetrotter
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Dying Europe
Posts: 3,837
Default Re: Future Science & Technology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael View Post
That's why I predicated this thread discussion on the baseline assumption that fusion power will be discovered sometime in the next few decades. Without that, I fear your photos will become all too realistic. Fusion energy is the minimum baseline of technology for human society to keep growing upwards and outwords. Without it, I fear we are doomed to watching our fossil fuel sources dwindle away while the planet's climate becomes increasingly problematic.
To add some counter-productive criticism to the thread:
There is no theoretical or experimental sign of fusion becoming a realistic prospect in the foreseeable future.
In the current context, if it were discovered/invented it'd probably get patented and be too exclusive and/or prohibitively costly to make a substantial difference.
What most people tend to forget in the context of peak oil is that the loss of that resource is not just a problem for mobility or heating. The truly enormous array of petroleum derivatives will have to be substituted too and all at the same time.
Fusion alone wouldn't solve all problems, far from it.

As for speculation, I'll pass. We're probably all going to be wrong anyway.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2008 - 2017, DiscussionWorldForum.com