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  #11  
Old Jul 15th 2012, 10:49 PM
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Default Re: Gravity on Spaceships

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Originally Posted by shekib82 View Post
We are speculating on star trek here. I don't know how they will do it, or if it is at all Possible, but given the way the spaceship looks like, gravity seems to be generated from the ground of the space ship. I postulate that it is by creating a field made up of gravitons which is the theoretical Particle that carries gravity. Now whether this makes scientific sense I don't know as I am not an astrophysicist. This thread should be taken with a bit of levity, so chill out.
Like I said, I don't mind speculating. But some speculations are plausible and some are not. A hypothetical source of gravity on the order of 1G that would be of a size convenient for a spaceship and would be located in it would result in such huge differences in gravitational pull between one part of the ship and another, simply because of the differing distances between these points and the gravitational source, that no force or material could withstand this space curvature. It's similar in essence (though not in scale) to what happens if you approach a black hole.

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Originally Posted by NickKIELCEPoland View Post
No, for me the back of the ship has to be the part of the ship which is furthest away from the place it is moving towards. Whether or not the engine is at the front, it seems totally baffling to me that the front of the ship (for me this is the opposite end of what I consider to be the back of the ship) could possibly be used as the floor - and as I said, that applies even if the engine is at the front - but what do I know, physics isn't my forté.
I didn't explain it very well. Perpendicular just means that the place of the floors is at a 90° angle to the axis front/back of the ship. The floor would indeed be at the back. Your feet would point to the engine and your head to the front of the ship.
See the accompanying *cough* drawing (with apologies for my complete lack of graphical skills):

Last edited by Dominick; Mar 15th 2013 at 11:50 AM.
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Old Jul 15th 2012, 11:40 PM
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Default Re: Gravity on Spaceships

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Originally Posted by Dominick View Post
Like I said, I don't mind speculating. But some speculations are plausible and some are not. A hypothetical source of gravity on the order of 1G that would be of a size convenient for a spaceship and would be located in it would result in such huge differences in gravitational pull between one part of the ship and another, simply because of the differing distances between these points and the gravitational source, that no force or material could withstand this space curvature. It's similar in essence (though not in scale) to what happens if you approach a black hole.


I didn't explain it very well. Perpendicular just means that the place of the floors is at a 90° angle to the axis front/back of the ship. The floor would indeed be at the back. Your feet would point to the engine and your head to the front of the ship.
See the accompanying *cough* drawing (with apologies for my complete lack of graphical skills):
I am sure someone thought that it would be impossible for humans to fly on sound scientific basis back in the year 100 AD.
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Old Jul 16th 2012, 05:57 PM
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Default Re: Gravity on Spaceships

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I am sure someone thought that it would be impossible for humans to fly on sound scientific basis back in the year 100 AD.
Actually on the contrary. Humans have been assuming that humans could fly for thousands of years - if only we could just figure out how. And they've been trying all along since Icarus.

Indeed, I doubt if anyone actually had enough science to actually (correctly) explain why humans couldn't fly until after we had invented airplanes.

Speaking of which, according to contemporary science, bubble-bees can't fly and curveballs don't curve. Of course, bubble-bees do fly and curveballs do curve.
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Old Jul 16th 2012, 07:06 PM
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Default Re: Gravity on Spaceships

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Originally Posted by shekib82 View Post
I am sure someone thought that it would be impossible for humans to fly on sound scientific basis back in the year 100 AD.
There was no scientific basis in 100 AD, let alone a sound one. We've really come a long way since tehn you know. The theory of relativity will be superseded one day, no doubt, but the concept won't. Every new theory has to agree numerically with all previous ones since it has to agree with all the experiments and observations that validated that one. There'll never be a meaningful theory that doesn't incorporate relativity as the observations indicate it's a property of our universe. And thus the issue with gravitational spaceships isn't going to go away.
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Old Jul 16th 2012, 07:12 PM
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Default Re: Gravity on Spaceships

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Speaking of which, according to contemporary science, bubble-bees can't fly and curveballs don't curve. Of course, bubble-bees do fly and curveballs do curve.
Those are both urban legends. For the latter the mechanism was described 160 years ago. It literally takes two seconds to check this. Just google 'curve ball physics' and 'bumble bee flight physics'
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Old Jul 16th 2012, 07:35 PM
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Default Re: Gravity on Spaceships

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Those are both urban legends. For the latter the mechanism was described 160 years ago. It literally takes two seconds to check this. Just google 'curve ball physics' and 'bumble bee flight physics'
Really? (checking snopes for this)

Btw, I remember that we had a thread here a way back and it was quite an interesting discussion that seemed to have included quite a bit of confirmation about those two particulars. Being an old fan of baseball, I've seen and read quite a bit about the mysterious curveball issue and find it interesting - I've read many baseball magazine articles mentioning the curveball mystery over the years.

Which is why I didn't bother checking this ones out - I thought they had already been checked out and discussed here. I normally do check out a lot of these old oddball factoids because so many are false.
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Old Jul 16th 2012, 10:00 PM
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Default Re: Gravity on Spaceships

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Really? (checking snopes for this)

Btw, I remember that we had a thread here a way back and it was quite an interesting discussion that seemed to have included quite a bit of confirmation about those two particulars. Being an old fan of baseball, I've seen and read quite a bit about the mysterious curveball issue and find it interesting - I've read many baseball magazine articles mentioning the curveball mystery over the years.

Which is why I didn't bother checking this ones out - I thought they had already been checked out and discussed here. I normally do check out a lot of these old oddball factoids because so many are false.
I didn't actually know about the curve ball thingy but I know how it works for billiard balls who can do the strangest curves and it turns out that for curve balls it's not much different, my guess would have been Bernoulli's principle but it's a variant thereupon i.e.
the Magnus effect

The bumble bees are more recent and actually pretty straightforward:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0507194511.htm
There's a paragraph on how the myth originated:
Quote:
Originally Posted by sciencedaily
The old myth that "bumblebees shouldn’t be able to fly" was based on calculations using the aerodynamic theory of 1918-19, just 15 years after the Wright brothers made the first powered flight. These early theories suggested that bumblebee wings were too small to create sufficient lift but since then scientists have made huge advances in understanding aerodynamics and how different kinds of airflow can generate lift.
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